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Auto Accident Chiropractor

If you've been injured in an auto accident, you are not alone.  According to an article from the LA Times, Los Angeles saw 55,350 collisions in 2016 alone, that's over 151 collisions per day.

Most people who are involved in any type of collision will suffer some type of injury. The most common type of injuries are whiplash type injuries, which describe a rapid acceleration-deceleration mechanism of injury causing damage to the soft tissues (muscles, ligaments, tendons) that support the neck, mid and lower back. In addition, cervical and lumbar disc bulges, as well as shoulder, wrist, and leg injuries are also very common.

It is important to note neither the speed of the accident, nor the property damage caused by the accident have much to do with the extent of the injuries sustained by the victim.

You can have significant injuries, even when the damage to your vehicle is low.

Chiropractic care is very effective in helping people recover from auto-accident injuries. A doctor of chiropractic is trained particularly to understand the mechanics and function of the spine, and can play an essential role in helping patients recover after they've been injured.

In our office we use different techniques including gentle chiropractic mobilizations, mechanical traction, exercise rehabilitation, electrical stimulation, laser therapy and acupuncture to help our injury patients.

If you have been injured in an auto accident, please seek immediate care as unattended acute injuries can become chronic and debilitating over time.

Dr. Eric - Your Santa Monica Chiropractor

310-993-8482


Here some startling facts about injuries and auto-accidents:

Incidence of Whiplash

1. Eighty three percent of individuals involved in motor vehicle accidents suffer a whiplash injury


Nolet PS, Pierre C. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, (2010) The association between a lifetime history of neck injury I a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study. Eur Spine J 19:972-981


2. Greater that 50% of those injured report ongoing neck pain one year after the accident

Carroll LJ, et al (2008) Course and prognostic factors for neck pain in whiplash-associated disorders: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. Spine 33 (suppl):S83-S92


3. For those experiencing neurological signs after a car accident, 90% may be symptomatic one year later.


Carroll LJ, et al (2008) Course and prognostic factors for neck pain in whiplash-associated disorders: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. Spine 33 (suppl):S83-S92


Rear-end Collision

4. Studies show that the vector of impact from a rear-end collision causes greater bodily injury that being struck from other angles.


Bylund PO, et al (1998) Sick leave and disability pension among passenger car occupants injured in urban traffic. Spine 23:1023-8

Sturzenegger Met al (1995) The effect of accident mechanism and initial findings on the long-term course of whiplash injury. J Neurol 242: 443-49


Dollar Amount of Damage


5. The amount of vehicle damage may have little relation to the injury sustained by the occupants.


Hirsch et al, (1998) Whiplash syndrome. Orthopedic Clinics of North America, Oct., p 791

Stursenegger Met al (1994) Presenting symptoms and signs after whiplash injury: The influence of accident mechanism. Neurology 44:688-93

Speed of Impact


6. Car accidents where the collision speed is 15 mph is well above the documented threshold for bodily injury. Morris reported that impacts of 5 mph or less routinely give rise to significant symptoms.


Morris F. (1998) Do head restraints protect the neck from whiplash injuries? Archives of Emergency Medicine, 6:17-21


Seat belt and Shoulder Harness


7. Seat belt and shoulder harness use have decreased the number of fatalities, but have significantly increased the number of spine injuries.


Larder DR et al (1985) Neck injury to car occupants using seat belts. BMJ 298:153-68


8. A study of 13,000 rear impact victims, found that restrained drivers were three times more likely to suffer cervical spine injuries.


Nygren A (1984) Injuries to car occupants-some aspects of interior safety of cars. Acta Oto-Laryngologica (Suppl #394)


9. One study noted that head restraints are not properly positioned 75-90% of the time, and in the full down position may act as a fulcrum and actually increase neck injury.


Sturzenegger Met al (1995) The effect of accident mechanism and initial findings on the long-term course of whiplash injury. J Neurol 242: 443-49


Rotated Head on Impact


10. One study found that the single factor most significantly related to symptom persistence was rotated head position at the time of impact.


Sturzenegger Met al (1995) The effect of accident mechanism and initial findings on the long-term course of whiplash injury. J Neurol 242: 443-49


Unaware on impending Impact


11. Occupants unaware or unprepared for impact experienced greater injury that those braced for impact.


Sturzenegger Met al (1995) The effect of accident mechanism and initial findings on the long-term course of whiplash injury. J Neurol 242: 443-49


12. Subjects that were unaware of the impending collision were 15 times more likely to have a persistent condition than those who were aware.


Ryan GV et al (1994) Neck strain in car occupants: injury status after 6 months and crash-related factors. Injury: International Journal of the Care of the Injured 25 (8): 533-537


13. Release in brake pressure during a rear-impact collision will magnify the resulting acceleration of the occupant while increasing the likelihood of a second collision. In addition, as the occupant decelerates and is thrust forward in the seat, the foot would most likely renew its contact with the brake pedal intensifying the deceleration of the occupant.


Croft A. (1994) Whiplash: The Masters Program


Age of Patient (older)


14. The age of the patient may be a factor on the degree of damage and the rate of healing. As tissue ages it becomes less elastic, reflexes slow and strength wanes.


Cassidy JD et al (2000) Effect of eliminating compensation for pain and suffering on the outcome of insurance claims for whiplash injury. N Eng J Med 342:1179-86


Female Patient


15. After a motor vehicle accident, females are more likely to report neck pain and slower recovery that males.


Carroll LJ, et al (2008) Course and prognostic factors for neck pain in whiplash-associated disorders: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. Spine 33 (suppl):S83-S92


Cassidy JD et al (2000) Effect of eliminating compensation for pain and suffering on the outcome of insurance claims for whiplash injury. N Eng J Med 342:1179-86

Hogg-Johnson S, van der Velde G, Carroll LJ Holm LW, Cassidy JD, Guzman J, Cote P. Haldeman S, Ammendolia C, Carragee E, Hurwitz E, Nordin M, Peloso PM (2008) The burden and determinants of neck pain in the general population: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain. Spine 33 (Suppl):S39-S51


Dufton JA et al, (2006) Prognostic factors associated with minimal improvement following acute whiplash associated disorders. Spine 31: E759-65

Taller female patient


16. There is also an increase in the risk of neck injury with a woman's height, and women tend to sit further forward in their car seats, moving them away from the head restraint.


Soft Tissue Review (1998) 3:8 p.29


History of prior neck pain


17. People with prior neck pain and headaches were three times as likely to experience symptoms after an MVA.


Drottning M, et al (2002) Cervicogenic headache after whiplash injury. Cephalgia 22: 165-71


18. Studies show that those reporting earlier or more severe post-MVA symptoms, had a poorer prognosis for recovery.


Carroll LJ, et al (2008) Course and prognostic factors for neck pain in whiplash-associated disorders: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. Spine 33 (suppl):S83-S92

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Complicating Factors


19. Risk factors for poor outcome include: depression, poor psychological coping mechanisms, lower household income, unemployment, cigarette smoking, and delayed treatment.


Hogg-Johnson S, van der Velde G, Carroll LJ Holm LW, Cassidy JD, Guzman J, Cote P. Haldeman S, Ammendolia C, Carragee E, Hurwitz E, Nordin M, Peloso PM (2008) The burden and determinants of neck pain in the general population: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain. Spine 33 (Suppl):S39-S51

Carroll LJ, et al (2008) Course and prognostic factors for neck pain in whiplash-associated disorders: results of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. Spine 33 (suppl):S83-S92

@

Nolet PS, Pierre C. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, (2010) The association between a lifetime history of neck injury I a motor vehicle collision and future neck pain: a population-based cohort study. Eur Spine J 19:972-981


Dufton JA et al, (2006) Prognostic factors associated with minimal improvement following acute whiplash associated disorders. Spine 31: E759-65